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Possible end to Act 44/89?
#1
For those who don't know, Acts 44 and 89 were passed by the PA State Legislature. In simple terms, PTC pays PennDOT a share of its revenue (i.e. tolls) to fund other road/transit projects around the state, including SEPTA. This also means that in order to stay solvent, the PTC must raise tolls annually (though I believe it's been in debt ever since Act 89 passed in 2013). This is why toll rates are much higher than ten years ago.

It's experienced pushback by a trucker's lobby, who refuse to pay the higher tolls by filing a lawsuit. I'm not sure how it's progressed lately (perhaps Matt/Zeffy could tell me? After all, you are in the area and perhaps this would've warranted a local news story), but I will link below a news article on the issue. As the story progresses, I will update this post to include newer articles.

https://www.philly.com/transportation/se...90225.html

IMO, I do support the trucker's lobby, but I also think their arguments are kinda moot. After all, most travelers on the Turnpike pay discounted rates since they use E-ZPass. However, I could see this being an issue for laggards who stick with cash.

Discuss below.

(FYI, tell me if this is against forum rules; I felt like spicing up this section a little bit (it's currently bland with just "favorite highway" threads) to incite discourse...I'm aware that this issue could get political at times)
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#2
It should end from 2030 to 2040.
NO to PennDOT  Angry  , YES to PTC.  Big Grin
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#3
(03-16-2019, 10:15 AM)LancerFourms Wrote: It should end from 2030 to 2040.

Should is the key word, here. The lawsuit could be lost, and Act 89 could still very well exist until 2050.

Time will tell in this case.
That gum you like is going to come back in style.
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#4
(03-16-2019, 09:36 PM)noelbotevera Wrote:
(03-16-2019, 10:15 AM)LancerFourms Wrote: It should end from 2030 to 2040.

Should is the key word, here. The lawsuit could be lost, and Act 89 could still very well exist until 2050.

Time will tell in this case.

I know.
NO to PennDOT  Angry  , YES to PTC.  Big Grin
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#5
I like the way NH designs its toll roads. Rather than extorting money from in state travelers, they extort money from tourists.
Attached is an example. The red lines are the Toll Roads and the green line is the MA/NH border.

It is no coincidence that the red lines lead up from Boston into the White Mountains.


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#6
(03-18-2019, 06:26 PM)WeeWill Wrote: I like the way NH designs its toll roads. Rather than extorting money from in state travelers, they extort money from tourists.
Attached is an example. The red lines are the Toll Roads and the green line is the MA/NH border.

It is no coincidence that the red lines lead up from Boston into the White Mountains.

The tolls up there are peanuts compared to what we're talking here. For example, the Spaulding Turnpike's toll rates is less than a cent per mile. The Pennsylvania Turnpike's 10-13 cents a mile. The most expensive turnpike (I forgot what it was - E-470?) is somewhere around 30-35 cents per mile.

Besides, there's plenty of ways to bypass the Turnpike. Long haul traffic takes I-68 through Maryland or I-80 through northern PA. Regional/local traffic takes US 30.

Point being, this debacle began because of PennDOT needing funds. A proposed solution was to toll I-80 about ten years ago, but it failed to pass the state legislature (I think; some of these details I've forgotten over time).
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#7
(03-18-2019, 07:23 PM)noelbotevera Wrote:
(03-18-2019, 06:26 PM)WeeWill Wrote: I like the way NH designs its toll roads. Rather than extorting money from in state travelers, they extort money from tourists.
Attached is an example. The red lines are the Toll Roads and the green line is the MA/NH border.

It is no coincidence that the red lines lead up from Boston into the White Mountains.

The tolls up there are peanuts compared to what we're talking here. For example, the Spaulding Turnpike's toll rates is less than a cent per mile. The Pennsylvania Turnpike's 10-13 cents a mile. The most expensive turnpike (I forgot what it was - E-470?) is somewhere around 30-35 cents per mile.

Besides, there's plenty of ways to bypass the Turnpike. Long haul traffic takes I-68 through Maryland or I-80 through northern PA. Regional/local traffic takes US 30.

Point being, this debacle began because of PennDOT needing funds. A proposed solution was to toll I-80 about ten years ago, but it failed to pass the state legislature (I think; some of these details I've forgotten over time).

Good point. The reason why NH and PA have toll roads are completely different. PA actually needs the money, while NH just wants money for more tourist amenities. If I remember correctly, the Hooksett Rest Area upgrade was funded mostly by toll money (and boy did they upgrade it!).
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